GPZ 750 1984 restoration project

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Re: GPZ 750 1984 restoration project

Postby davidr1963 » Mon Jun 11, 2018 6:35 pm

The_Fixer wrote:Speaking of syncing the carbs, have been thinking about buying one of those Digisync manometers.
http://thedigisync.com/
Not a plug for it, but it does seem to be a reasonably priced option compared to the old vacuum gauge/mercury things, with the claim of being more accurate.

I would wonder what level of accuracy would be necessary, but has anyone heard anyone's opinions/reviews of them? Seems to be a simpler setup and read system with an auto calibrate mode.


I try to get them all within 1cm mercury but it’s a fiddly job and even tightening the lock nut can throw the balance out. That and the levels are constantly changing. It does make a difference though once you’ve got it close.
I like the look of the digital one though and I think I may invest in a set to give it a try. It’s about time I replaced mercury gauges with yellowed tubes!
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Re: GPZ 750 1984 restoration project

Postby The_Fixer » Sun Jun 17, 2018 4:40 pm

Well. I wasn't planning on going this far with the bike at this time, but when I took the swing arm off and found some rusty bushes and dead bearings in the unitrack linkages, time to take the main stand off to get the last bolts out.

That meant taking the engine out. Now it's down to the bare frame. Sigh. I guess we're going all the way now.Removed the wiring harness as well and hit the frame with the Gerni.

The engine is quite light. I could carry the Honda F1 (750) motor, just. This one is heaps lighter. I would say it's a one hand job, but I would be bragging.... ;) ;)

Got access to a sandblaster (industrial), so will repaint the frame, may as well while it's disassembled.
Will tidy up the wiring and re wrap the harness as well. Got heaps of harness tape.
Front forks showing signs of a little internal rust, will have to look into that more. Steering head bearings look like they could be replaced as well. Lots to be done.

Must say I was surprised to see the original rear shock on it still looking great. Boot rubber as well. A couple of minor splits in it, will look at fixing it. Rubber is still quite soft and pliable.

Got some pics, forgotten how to affix them. Will be back later to do so.
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Re: GPZ 750 1984 restoration project

Postby The_Fixer » Sun Jun 17, 2018 5:10 pm

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The_Fixer
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Re: GPZ 750 1984 restoration project

Postby The_Fixer » Fri Jun 22, 2018 6:47 pm

Just got the fork assembly apart, but the legs are still in one piece.

The manual says the anti dive units need to be replaced every couple of years (service item), so I very much doubt these are readily available nowadays.

Anyone know of a fix or workaround for this?

I am intending to strip the legs and refurbish as necessary, that oil came out pretty black looking....
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Re: GPZ 750 1984 restoration project

Postby davidr1963 » Sat Jun 23, 2018 2:31 am

You often find that the anti dive units have been removed and blanking plates used to blank off the holes.

I read somewhere about how to test them and I’m not sure that I haven’t seen repair kits on eBay but I’ve never heard of them being a service item before.

I’d be inclined to just put them back on and, if you get too much dive under braking, use a heavier weight fork oil. I’m currently using 15 weight as opposed to the standard 10.
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